Tullian Tchividjian on the Theology of the Cross

Really needed to hear the last part of this quote today, but I thought I’d quote it in context:

“In the church, one hallmark of a theology of glory is the unwillingness to acknowledge the reality of ongoing sin and lack of transformation in Christians.  A sign that you are operating with a theology of glory is when your faith feels like a fight against these realities instead of a resource for accepting them…

A theology of the cross, in contrast, understands the cross to be the ultimate statement of God’s involvement in this world on this side of heaven.  A theology of the cross accepts the difficult thing rather than immediately trying to change it or use it.  It looks directly into the pain, and ‘calls a thing what it is’ instead of calling evil good and good evil.  It identifies God as ‘hidden in [the] suffering.’  Luther actually took things one key step further.  He said that God was not only hidden in the suffering, but he was at work in our anxiety and doubt.  When you are at the end of your rope–when you no longer have hope within yourself–that is when you run to God for mercy.”

Tullian Tchividjian “Glorious Ruin

Advertisements

Luther on Psalm 51:17

Below is Luther’s thoughts on Psalm 51:17, “Psalm 51:17   The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit; a broken and contrite heart, O God, you will not despise. ”  Came across them last night, thought I’d share them with you:

“God is not the kind of God who wants to frighten the frightened or break the broken even more, but one who loves the broken, afflicted, and humble, who expects and hears the sighs and voices of the wretched…  In his true form God is a God who loves the afflicted, has mercy upon the humbled, forgives the fallen, and revives the drooping.  How can any more pleasant picture be painted of God.”

Luther’s exposition of Psalm 51

How I comfort people. .. :D

An Answer to “Dwight’s” Question

A couple days ago I posted a quote about Lutheran Theology from Stephen Paulson.  Here’s the quote in full:

“Lutheran theology starts where all others end.  Virtue is not the goal of life, virtue is our problem.  Religion is not given for morality; it is there to end it.  The picture of progress upward to happiness is toppled, and in its stead is the apocalyptic end of righteousness in this world so that only Christ remains, who alone is righteous in the eyes of God.”

At first I hesitated to post this because it is slightly vague, confusing  and without a background in Lutheran theology it might be misunderstood.  This said, I posted it because I thought it perfectly described what I have observed to be the end result of most Lutheran theology: only Jesus remains. Continue reading

Paul Zahl Talks Suicide at Liberate

Once again my former professor and friend speaks love and grace into a subject laced with fear and condemnation.  Here’s my highlight of the post:

Life is tragic. Suicide is a serious option. Lots of people have been doing it for a very long time. We just didn’t talk about it much. Now even more people are doing it, and we are, a little, talking about it. It is OK—it is normal—to have the thought. And the moment you know that God forgives you the thought and that He can handle the thought, its impulsive hypnotic grip on you begins to loosen. And you find yourself saying—and more important, feeling—like Scarlett O’Hara in Gone with the Wind: “Tomorrow is another day.”

For the rest of the post head over to Liberate.

Keller on Community

“The gospel creates community.  Because it points us to the One who died for his enemies, it creates relationships of service rather than selfishness.  Because it removes both fear and pride, people get along inside the church who could never get along outside…  Thus the gospel creates a human community radically different from any society around it.”

Timothy Keller “Center Church

 

Lutheran Theology

“Lutheran theology starts where all others end.  Virtue is not the goal of life, virtue is our problem.  Religion is not given for morality; it is there to end it.  The picture of progress upward to happiness is toppled, and in its stead is the apocalyptic end of righteousness in this world so that only Christ remains, who alone is righteous in the eyes of God.”

Steven Paulson “Lutheran Theology